Accelerating Best Practices in Peer Support Around the World

Leadership of Peers for Progress

  • Edwin B. Fisher, PhD

    Global Director
    Peers for Progress

    Professor
    Department of Health Behavior, Gillings School of Global Public Health, UNC Chapel Hill

    Provides overall leadership and strategic guidance to the Peers for Progress program. Works with partners and others active in diabetes to develop key collaborative relationships.

  • Patrick Yao Tang, MPH

    Program Manager
    Department of Health Behavior, Gillings School of Global Public Health, UNC Chapel Hill

    Assists the Program Development Center with resource development, network building, and social media marketing. Designs targeted presentations and guides, creates and maintains website content, and assists in enhancing the China Network.

  • Veronica A. Carlisle, MPH, CHES

    Community Health Educator
    Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center,
    Department of Health Behavior, Gillings School of Global Public Health,
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Work with community partners, organizational partners, academic partners and Lineberger to assist with the integration of peer support approaches into programs and research to enhance cancer care from cancer prevention to cancer survivorship throughout UNC, North Carolina and the region.

  • Sarah Kowitt

    Research Assistant
    Department of Health Behavior, Gillings School of Global Public Health, UNC Chapel Hill

    Sarah is broadly interested in the nexus between physical and mental health and how chronic disease “self” management is influenced by a variety of different factors at the community and interpersonal levels.

  • Rebeccah Sokol

    Research Assistant
    Department of Health Behavior, Gillings School of Global Public Health, UNC Chapel Hill

    Rebeccah’s research interests include evaluating the impact of peer support programs on health outcomes among hardly reached populations. She is primarily interested in studies and interventions related to the family context’s influence on diet-related health outcomes.

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