Accelerating Best Practices in Peer Support Around the World

MoPo Tsyo

10.30.14

Comparing Diabetes Support in 3 Countries

Clayton Velicer, MPH

Our website has frequently promoted peer support and community health worker programs around the world including programs in Afghanistan, China, Australia, and India.

In this week’s blog, we discuss the findings from a recent article that compares the peer-led MoPoTsyo program in Cambodia with diabetes support programs in two other low- and medium- income countries (DR Congo and Philippines).
DR Congo
The program in Kinshasa, DR Congo includes 80 primary care centers (called Kin-Reseau) that deliver diabetes care as part of its basic package. The program was founded 40 years ago by a missionary doctor that trained the health center staff to decentralize care. The centers offer a weekly health center visit and bi-monthly medical consultation by a trained doctor that includes glucose and blood pressure measurements and foot care. Medicines are offered at subsidized rates and patients on insulin receive their injections at the health center with a nurse’s…

6.1.12

MoPoTsyo Blog 3

Scaling up

This is the final post of a three part series of guest blogs based on writings provided by Maurits van Pelt, Director of MoPoTsyo Patient Information Centre in Cambodia. Collectively these writings provide a roadmap for scaling up peer educator networks and developing sustainability for what is now still an intervention organized and facilitated by a Cambodian NGO. Part 1 focused on developing a Niche and Demonstrating value. Part 2 Focused on Integration. Part 3 focuses on the scaling up process.

Why do many organizations fail to scale up interventions?
There have been many attempts to scale up interventions in the health sector by engaging with the community that have not been successful. The reasons for these failures in low resource contexts are multiple and complex (Bloom & Ainsworth, 2010). Often times there is not a lasting community engagement even when resources are made available because training is either too short or handed down as a set of technical…

12.13.11

MoPoTsyo Blog 2

INTEGRATION makes sense, but HOW?

This is the second post of a three part series of guest blogs based on writings provided by Maurits van Pelt, Director of MoPoTsyo Patient Information Centre in Cambodia. Collectively these writings will provide a roadmap for scaling up peer educator networks and developing sustainability for what is now still an intervention organized and facilitated by a Cambodian NGO. Part 1 focused on developing a Niche and Demonstrating value. Part 2 Focuses on Integration. Maurits van Pelt.

INTEGRATION makes sense, but HOW?

Recognizing the cost effectiveness of the Peer Educator Networks (P.E.N.), the Cambodian Ministry of Health recently approached MoPoTsyo to have the benign neoplastic P.E.N. become more integrated into Cambodia’s primary health care system. This could increase MoPoTyso sustainability by getting government network costs not yet recovered through revenues generated from service provided to members, as well as lead to better access to…

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