Accelerating Best Practices in Peer Support Around the World

Mental Health

10.6.20

The Fundamental Value of Presence in Peer and Mutual Support: Observations from Telephone Support for High Risk Groups

Global Journal of Community Psychology Practice. 2020;11(3),1-20. [Full Article]

Fisher EB, Tang PT, Evans M, Bhushan N, Graham MA, Dreyer Valovcin D, Castellano C

Abstract
“Being there” takes on considerable importance amidst recognition of the substantial deleterious effects of social isolation and loneliness. In particular, presence/ “being there” may be important features of the many contributions of peer and mutual support to health and wellbeing. This study examined how peer support may enhance a sense of presence based on a) contact data for years 2015-2016 from telephonic peer support services of Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care, and b) structured interviews with peer supporters and clients of these programs. Features of peer support that convey presence include a) 24/7 availability, b) structure of peer support around shared cultural roles – e.g., “Cop2Cop,” “Mom2Mom,” rather than shared diagnoses, c) training of supporters to provide a…

7.7.20

Standardization and Adaptability for Dissemination of Telephone Peer Support for High-Risk Groups: General Evaluation and Lessons Learned

Transl Behav Med. 2020;ibaa047. doi:10.1093/tbm/ibaa047. [Pubmed Abstract]

Evans M, Tang PY, Bhushan N, Fisher EB, Dreyer Valovcin D, Castellano C

Abstract
Beyond demonstrated effectiveness, research needs to identify how peer support can be implemented in real-world settings. Telephone peer support offers one approach to this. The purpose of this study is to evaluate telephone peer support provided by trained peer staff for high-risk groups, implemented according to key tasks or functions of the Reciprocal Peer Support model (RPS) providing both standardization and adaptability. The methods used in the study include the review of contact data for years 2015-2016 from telephone peer support services of Rutgers Health University Behavioral Health Care, serving veterans, police, mothers of children with special needs, and child protection workers; structured interviews with peer supporters and clients; and audit of case notes. Across 2015-2016, peer supporters made 64,786…

3.6.20

Randomised clinical trial of community-based peer-led and psychologist-led group treatment for hoarding disorder

BJPsych Open. 2018 Jul 20;4(4):285-293. doi: 10.1192/bjo.2018.30. eCollection 2018 Jul. [Full Text Article]

Mathews CA, Mackin RS, Chou CY, Uhm SY, Bain LD, Stark SJ, Gause M, Vigil OR, Franklin J, Salazar M, Plumadore J, Smith LC, Komaiko K, Howell G, Vega E, Chan J, Eckfield MB, Tsoh JY, Delucchi K

Background
Treatment for hoarding disorder is typically performed by mental health professionals, potentially limiting access to care in underserved areas.

Aims
We aimed to conduct a non-inferiority trial of group peer-facilitated therapy (G-PFT) and group psychologist-led cognitive–behavioural therapy (G-CBT).

Method
We randomised 323 adults with hording disorder 15 weeks of G-PFT or 16 weeks of G-CBT and assessed at baseline, post-treatment and longitudinally (≥3 months post-treatment: mean 14.4 months, range 3–25). Predictors of treatment response were examined.

Results
G-PFT (effect size 1.20) was as effective as G-CBT (effect size 1.21; between-group…

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