Accelerating Best Practices in Peer Support Around the World

Mental Health

7.10.19

Effectiveness of the NAMI Homefront Program for Military and Veteran Families: In-Person and Online Benefits

Psychiatr Serv. 2019 Jul 5. [Pubmed Abstract]

Haselden M, Brister T, Robinson S, Covell N, Pauselli L, Dixon L

Objective
This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of Homefront, a six-session, peer-taught family education program by the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), delivered in person or online, for families or support persons of military service members or of veterans with mental illness.

Methods
Program participants completed online surveys at baseline, at the end of the program (postprogram), and at 3-month follow-up, which measured subjective empowerment, burden, coping, psychological distress, family functioning, experience of caregiving, and knowledge of mental illness. A mixed-effects model examined change over time.

Results
A total of 119 individuals (in person, N=63 [53%]; online, N=56 [47%]) enrolled. Participants showed statistically significant improvement on all dimensions between baseline, postprogram, and follow-up, except for…

8.31.16

Peer-Delivered Recovery Support Services for Addictions in the United States: A Systematic Review

J Subst Abuse Treat. 2016 Apr;63:1-9. [Pubmed Abstract]

Peer-Delivered Recovery Support Services for Addictions in the United States: A Systematic Review
Bassuk EL, Hanson J, Greene RN, Richard M, Laudet A

Abstract
This systematic review identifies, appraises, and summarizes the evidence on the effectiveness of peer-delivered recovery support services for people in recovery from alcohol and drug addiction. Nine studies met criteria for inclusion in the review. They were assessed for quality and outcomes including substance use and recovery-related factors. Despite significant methodological limitations found in the included studies, the body of evidence suggests salutary effects on participants. Current limitations and recommendations for future research are discussed.

10.21.15

CHWs: Potential allies for the field of psychiatric rehabilitation?

Psychiatr Rehabil J. 2015 Sep;38(3):207-9. [Pubmed Abstract]

Community health workers: Potential allies for the field of psychiatric rehabilitation?
Cook JA, Mueser KT

Abstract
The focus of community health workers on health disparities in vulnerable communities means that they address issues of poverty, while many recipients of psychiatric rehabilitation services live at or below the poverty line. Their focus on improving health in low-income populations of color is in line with some of our field’s biggest challenges at this point in history, including poverty, cultural competence, and health comorbidities. By allying with community health workers we have the opportunity to extend our reach into new neighborhoods as well as to better serve our current clientele. By reaching out to local community health worker programs, conducting cross-training, and exploring new funding opportunities presented by health care reform, we may be able to enrich the multidisciplinary,…

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